Nagoya Castle to Miya no Watashi/Full Area Map

illust map

Illustration: Clemens Metzler

  • 1

    [Exhibition] Ichihara Etsuko
    [Closing Talk] Ichihara Etsuko × Tsuda Yoshinori

  • 2

    [Exhibition] softpad

  • 3

    [Special Talk & Performance] Nakajima Nanako “No(h) to Trio A”

  • 4

    [Relay Talk] “pouring/poured”
    [Performance] Horio Kanta

  • 5

    [Performance] Formant Brothers

  • 6

    [Exhibition & Performance] Nakayama Akiko

  • 7

    [Exhibition & Performance] Shinoda Chiharu

  • 8

    [Exhibition] Horio Kanta

Nagoya Castle Area (Nagoya Noh Theater ・ Ito Historic Residence)

The development of Nagoya’s culture and economy since the early modern period has focused primarily on the districts around Nagoya Castle. In front of Nagoya Castle (on the south side), the foundations of what is now Nagoya were laid with the establishment of the district called "Kibanwari" where the townspeople lived. Supporting that castle town was the Horikawa River, as it was the core for water transport of the people’s daily necessities.
At the time excavation began, the northern end of the Horikawa River was at the end of the canal at Asahi Bridge, and it is said that up to that point, Nagoya Castle’s moat was supplied spring water.

  • Nagoya Noh Theater

    Nagoya Noh Theater

  • Ito Historic Residence

    Ito Historic Residence

Access (nearest station)

  • Nagoya Noh Theater
    Shiyakusho (City Hall) Subway Sta. exit 7 (approx. 10 minutes walk)
    Sengen-cho Subway Sta. exit 1 (approx. 10 minutes walk)
  • Ito Historic Residence
    Marunouchi Subway Sta. exit 7 (approx. 10 minutes walk)
    Kokusai Center Subway Sta. exit 2 (approx. 10 minutes walk)
  • Exhibition
  • Performance
  • Talk
  • Collaboration Events

Nayabashi Bridge Area

Seven bridges built during the Edo period cross the Horikawa River, which connects Nagoya Castle to the sea at Atsuta. Named after a site nearby, Nayabashi Bridge was built when the Horikawa River was excavated, in conjunction with the construction of Nagoya Castle. During the Edo period, pottery from Seto, one of the leading pottery producing areas in Japan, was transported via the Yada and Shonai Rivers and collected and inspected at the Owari clan’s storehouses along the side of the Horikawa River (currently near Tennozaki Bridge, Mitsukura Street) before being shipped throughout Japan.

  • Hori River

    Hori River

  • Nayabashi Siam’s Garden

    Nayabashi Siam’s Garden

Access (nearest station)

  • Nayabashi Siam’s Garden
    Fushimi Subway Sta. exit 7 or 8 (approx. 10 minutes walk)
  • Exhibition
  • Performance
  • Talk
  • Collaboration Events

Atsuta/Miya no Watashi Area

Today, the area around Atsuta is surrounded by national roads and buildings, and it is now far from the sea, but around the beginning of the Edo period, it prospered as a base for shipping, with the Ise Bay spreading out before Miya no Watashi, the only maritime route along the Old Tokaido Road. In 1625, a nightlight was erected, indicating the gateway for entering and exiting vessels. Since the Edo period, the development of reclaimed marshlands has proceeded gradually, and the sea has become more distant from this land. Now, these reclaimed mashes have been transformed into land for factories and residential areas.

  • Niwa Historic Residence

    Niwa Historic Residence

  • Miya no Watashi Park

    Miya no Watashi Park

Access (nearest station)

  • Niwa Historic Residence
    Temma-cho Subway Sta. exit 4 (approx. 12 minutes walk)
  • Exhibition
  • Performance
  • Talk
  • Collaboration Events